The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture / Tagus Press is a multidisciplinary international studies and outreach unit dedicated to the study of the language, literatures and cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world. Working in close partnership with the Department of Portuguese and the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives, it is the oldest of these units devoted to Portuguese at UMass Dartmouth.

Events - 2004

Launching
Portuguese Literary & Cultural Studies 8
Cape Verde: Language, Literature & Music with author Manuel Veiga
Boston Public Library, Copley Square,
February 4, 2004

Co-sponsored by:

  • The Boston Consulate of the Republic of Cape Verde
  • TACV–Cape Verde Airlines
  • Common Threads–Cape Verdean Community Conferences

Click here to view the program.

top

Conference and lauching
"Lusophone African Literatures", Portuguese Literary & Cultural Studies 8 "Cape Verde: Language, Literature & Music" and 10 "Reevaluating Mozambique"
Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
February 6, 2004
Co-sponsored by the Luso-American Foundation and Rutgers University, New Brunswick

Click here to view the program.

top

Contemporary Portuguese-American Literature: Readings and Discussions

  • February 9, 2004
    Katherine Vaz, Novelist

    Katherine Vaz, a Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in Creative Writing (Fiction) at Harvard University, is the author of Saudade (St. Martin's Press & Edições ASA) and Mariana (in six languages, selected by the Library of Congress as one of the Top 30 International Books of 1998). Her collection Fado & Other Stories won the 1997 Drue Heinz Literature Prize. Vaz's stories have appeared in numerous magazines, and she is the first Luso-American to have her work recorded for the archives of the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress.
  • February 24, 2004
    Paulo A. Pereira, Playwright

    Paulo A. Pereira was born and raised in New Bedford. He graduated from Bishop Stang High School and earned a degree in Theater Arts and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. At MIT, he was involved in numerous productions, on- and off-campus, as an actor, a director, a producer, and a playwright. Amarelo, his first full-length play, opened in New York City in 1998. More recently, Paulo co-produced the first-ever MIT Theater Arts Alumni production, and Amarelo was performed at UMass Dartmouth, produced by Culture*Park and sponsored by the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture. For the last nine years, Paulo has worked as a customer support engineer and manager for Teloquent Communications in Billerica, MA. Paulo, his wife Leah, and their daughter Alexandrina reside in Merrimack, NH.
  • March 9, 2004
    Francisco C. Fagundes, Writer and Translator

    Francisco Cota Fagundes was born in Terceira, Azores, Portugal. He emigrated to the United States in 1963, and worked for three and a half years in the dairy industry as a milker. A serious accident rendered him incapacitated for farm work. Having had only a primary school education in his native island, he nevertheless enrolled at a junior college, transferred to the University of California, Los Angeles, where he completed a double B.A. summa cum laude (1972), an M.A. in Luso-Brazilian Studies (1974), and a PhD (1976) in Hispanic Languages and Literatures, with a dissertation on Fernando Pessoa. Professor Fagundes has been teaching at the University of Masssachusetts Amherst, where he is currently professor of Portuguese. The author of numerous books and essays on contemporary Portuguese literature, his latest books include Metamorfoses do Amor: Estudos sobre a Ficção Breve de Jorge de Sena (1999); "Para Emergir Nascemos ..." Estudos em Rememoroção de Jorge de Sena (ed. with Paula Gândara; 2000); Tudo Isto Que Rodeia Jorge de Sena: An International Colloquium (ed. with Paula Gândara; 2003); and Desta e da Outra Margem do Atlantico: Estudos de Literatura Açoriana e da Diáspora (2003). Francisco Cota Fagundes is also the author of an autobiography, Hard Knocks: An Azorean-American Odyssey (memoir) (2000), from which he will read.
  • March 23, 2004
    Thomas J. Braga, Poet

    Thomas J. Braga, Professor Emeritus of French, was born in Fall River, Massachusetts in 1943. After graduating from BMC Durfee High School in 1962, he received his BA in French and the Modern Language Award from Providence College in 1966. The recipient of a NDEA Fellowship, he earned his Ph.D. in French Literature at Rice University in 1970. He taught at California State College, San Bernardino and Plattsburgh State University of New York.
  • April 13, 2004
    Frank X. Gaspar, Poet and Novelist

    Frank X. Gaspar is Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Long Beach City College and author of three award-winning books of poetry, The Holyoke (1988), Mass for the Grace of a Happy Death (1994), and, most recently, A Field Guide to the Heavens, winner of the 1998 Brittingham Prize. Many of his poems deal with his growing up in Provincetown in a Portuguese fishing family as the grandson of a famous clam digger.

Sponsored, in part, by Fall River Herald News, New Bedford Standard-Times, O Jornal, and Portuguese Times.

top

Lecture
"The United Nations in Mozambique:Literary Reflections on Imperial Force"
by Philip Rothwwell, Rutgers University New Brunswick
Tuesday, June 29, 2004

Philip Rothwell is Portuguese Program Coordinator and Assistant Graduate Director in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Rutgers, New Brunswick. He worked for the Ministry of Education in Mozambique as well as for the Eshowe Career Service in South Africa. He holds a doctorate from the Univerisy of Cambridge, and recently published A Postmodern Nationalist: Truth, Orality, and Gender in the work of Mia Couto (Bucknell University Press, 2004).

top

Lecture
“Krioulo and the Musical Traditions of Cape Verde”
Susan Hurley-Glowa, Franklin & Marshall College
Tuesday, July 6, 2004

Susan Hurley-Glowa has a Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from Brown University (1997) and is Assistant Professor of Music at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, PA, where she teaches courses in world music and Western art music. Her doctoral dissertation is based on extended fieldwork in Santiago, Cape Verde, and focuses on batuko and funana, musical traditions associated with the people of Santiago. She also conducts fieldwork in the Cape Verdean communities of Southern New England, often in conjunction with the musician Norberto Tavares.

top

Concert
The Teresa Inês Quartet with Special Guest Fernando Brandão
Friday, July 9, 2004

Teresa Inês is a Brazilian singer, composer and acoustic guitar player who has performed in many events, including The Cambridge River Festival and Boston First Night and is a regular feature in jazz clubs such as Ryles and the Regattabar. She has also performed live in public radio stations such as WGBH, WERS, and WBUR radio programs. Fernando Brandão is a well known flutist and founder of Brasileirinho. The repertory includes Bossa Nova songs rearranged in a personal interpretation.

top

Lecture
"Contemporary Cape Verdean Literature"
Russell Hamilton, Vanderbilt University
Tuesday, July 13, 2004

Russell G. Hamilton is Professor Emeritus of Lusophone, African, Brazilian and Portuguese Literatures at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. In 1978-79 he spent a sabbatical year in Cape Verde, Angola, and Mozambique. Over the ensuing decades he has had the opportunity to make frequent research trips to all five Lusophone African countries, as well as Portugal and Brazil. The author of two books, Voices from an Empire: A History of Afro-Portuguese Literature and the two-volume Literatura Africana, Literatura Necessária, he also has published numerous chapters, articles, essays, and encyclopedia entries. One of several of his recent articles is “Chronicling from the Center of the Periphery: Estórias Contadas by Germano Almeida,” published in the recent issue of Portuguese Literary & Cultural Studies devoted to “Cape Verde: Language, Literature& Music.”

top

Concert
An Evening of Cape Verdean Music with Lutchinha
Friday, July 16, 2004

Maria Leite, or Lutchinha, was born on the island of Sao Vincente in the Cape Verdean islands. She has sung in "Noites Caboverdianas" in Sao Vincente, and participated in "Festival de Vozes Femeninas" in Praia, with Cesaria Evora, Zenaida Chantre, Titina, and other major artists. In 1988 she represented Cape Verde in the International Students Festival in the Soviet Union and has performed in Portugal. Lutchinha has recorded with many Cape Verdean artists, including Ramiro Mendes, Calu Bana, Ze Rui, and Jaqueline Fortes. She is currently promoting the release of her first solo CD, "Castanhinha," which will be released in the spring of 2004.

top

Lecture
Tuesday, July 20, 2004
"Nations Made By Poets: Writing on the Eve of Revolutions in Lusophone Africa"
Phyllis Peres, University of Maryland

Phyllis Peres holds a Ph.D. in Spanish and Portuguese from the University of Minnesota (1986). She has taught at the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), the University of Missouri and, since 1990, at the University of Maryland. Dr. Peres currently holds a joint faculty appointment in the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures and the Latin American Studies Center. She teaches classes in advanced Portuguese language, Brazilin literature and culture, African-Brazilian Literature and Culture, Lusophone African Literatures and Cultures, Portuguese Studies, and Latin American Studies. Since 2001, Dr. Peres serves as Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the Office of the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs. Dr. Peres research experties and interests intersect various fields within Luso-Brazilian and Latin American Studies, and her work is part of the emerging area of "Trans-Atlantic Studies." She has published extensively on Angolan literature and other Lusophone African Literatures, African-Brazilian culture, and Trans-Atlantic cultural relations within the Portuguese-speaking world. Dr. Peres is a two time Fulbright scholoar (Brazil and Portugal) and has co-directed two National Humanities (NEH) Summer Institutes in Brazil for U.S. university and college faculty (1992 and 1998).

top

Concert
"Transfigured Worlds: Tracing the Romantic Spirit from Lisbon to Vienna"
Friday, July 23, 2004

What happens when artists meet at the margins of their disciplines, and push the boundaries back and forth? For musicians Consuelo Sherba, Charles Sherba, and actor Nigel Gore, the result has been Aurea, a performance ensemble engaging in the livliest pursuit: to investigate and invigorate the harmony of music and the spoken word."Transfigured Worlds: Tracing the Romantic Spirit from Lisbon to Vienna" revolves around "Verkaerte Nacht" (Transfigured Night) by Arnold Schoenberg, the early tone poem for string Sextet, inspired by the poem of Dehmel. The program juxtaposes the poetry of Dehmel and Portuguese writer, Jorge de Sena who wrote a poem inspired by the Schoenberg, with the Schoenberg and also includes music by Beethoven and de Freitas. Readings from Beethoven's Heilegenstadt Testament, as well as other poetry of De Sena, Portuguese composer Frederico De Freitas' duo for violin and cello and Beethoven's String Trio round out the program.

top

Concert
The Beating Heart of Brazil: A Multimedia Tribute to Ary Barroso
September 10, 2004

Featuring classic songs of unforgettable charm and poetry, such as "Aquarela do Brasil" (or "Brazil"), "Camisa amarela," and "É luxo só," the program will include video clips, theatrical skits, and commentaries on Barroso's life and work. As a tribute to the first centenary of his birth, the program will include art concepts and picturesque anecdotes of a nationalist artist who made history with his own radio shows, unique soccer narration style, and baffling refusal to work for Disney Enterprises, despite an alluring salary (after all, Ary Barroso would not be able to see his beloved Flamengo soccer team play in California in the 1940s).

top

Conference
3rd Annual Conference on Portuguese Language Education: Old Challenges, New Strategies
September 18 & September 25, 2004

top

Exhibition
Through a Portagee Gate: Photographs of New Bedford
Opening of Exhibition and Book Launching
University Art Gallery
September 25, 2004

top

Reading
September 25, 2004
Dramatic Reading of Excerpts from Through a Portagee Gate
by Charles Reis Felix

Through a Portagee Gate by Charles Reis Felix is both an autobiography and a biography. It gives a remarkably honest self-portrait and an endearing tribute to the author's father, a Portuguese immigrant cobbler who came to America in 1915. The narrative reveals a deep desire to escape the confines of the immigrant, ethnic world, while also acknowledging a keen nostalgia about one's past, a need to remember and pay tribute to those who came before us. Felix accomplishes this through unforgettable dialogue and vivid characterizations worthy of Steinbeck, a prose, sometimes poignant, at other times hilarious, that strips human experience to its bare and powerful elements.

top

Reading and Discussion
October 25, 2004
Reading and Discussion with Portuguese noted author Lídia Jorge

Lídia Jorge was born in 1946 in Boliqueime, Algarve, the southern region of Portugal that became the setting of several of her works of fiction. She is author of eight novels, beginning with O Dia dos Prodígios (1980), two collections of short stories, and a play (A Maçom) based on the life of the pioneering Portuguese feminist and social activist Adelaide Cabete. Her works have been translated into many languages and awarded a number of presitigious Portuguese and international literary prizes, among them the French Prix Jean Monet (2000) and the Internatiotional IMPAC Dublin Literary Award (2002). Two of Jorge's novels are available in English translation The Murmuring Coast (U of Minnesota Press, 1995) and The Painter of Birds (Harcourt, 2001). In an interview published in the UMass Dartmouth journal Portuguese Literary & Cultural Studies (Spring 1999), Jorge said that her novels "take stock of a Mediterranean image of woman" whose "strength is powerful and subversive, more invisible than socially apparent."

top

Lecture
Brazil's Cultural History: New Trends in Representation and Interpretation
A Lecture Series organized by Professor Dário Borim, Department of Portuguese

Marilyn Halter is Professor of History and Director of the American and New England Studies Program at Boston University where she is also a Research Associate at BU's Institute on Culture, Religion and World Affairs. An interdisciplinary scholar, she specializes in the history, sociology of American immigration, race, ethnicity, entrepreneurship, and consumer society. She is the author of books, book chapters and articles related to immigrants of African descent including Between Race and Ethnicity: Cape Verdean American Immigrants, 1860-1965.

top

Lecture
"Ethnic Diversity in Visual Culture: Brazilian Art from the Colonial Period to the Present"
Memory Holloway, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Wednesday, October 13, 2004

Memory Holloway teaches 20th century art at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, including courses on the art and architecture of Portugal and Brazil. She has organized and written extensively on Portuguese art, including that of Paula Rego and handmade objects from the Azores. Dr Holloway has recently put together an exhibition on Portuguese immigration as seen in 19th century photographs of New Bedford from the Whaling Museum. She has attended conferences in Bahia and worked as commissioner for Australia at the Bienal Internacional de São Paulo, one of most widely visited and most highly regarded expositions of contemporary art in the world. Memory Holloway holds a PhD from the London University.

top

Lecture
"Analyzing an Oblique Gaze in Literature: The Way Brazil and Hispanic America Perceive Each Other."
Rodolfo Franconi, Dartmouth College

Coordinator of the Brazilian section of Revista de Crítica Literaria Latinoamericana and organizer of several international conferences, Dr. Franconi has authored various articles on issues of identity and sexuality in Latin American literature and culture. His book Erotismo e Poder na ficção contemporânea brasileira came out in 1997. He has held visiting positions at the University of Minnesota, Vanderbilt University, and Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. He is presently working on a book-project titled Brasil e Hispanoamérica: la mirada oblicua/o olhar oblíquo: América Hispânica e Brasil, an anthology of articles on the perception of the "other next door" by Brazilian and Spanish American writers. A graduate in Languages from USP, Universidade de São Paulo, Franconi holds a Ph.D. in Portuguese and Spanish from Vanderbilt University.

top

Lecture
"Architecture and Hermeneutics: Constructing Social Identity in São Paulo, Brazil 1930-1960"
Cristina Mehrtens, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Wednesday, November 3, 2004

Cristina Mehrtens is an assistant professor in the History Department.  She holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Miami and a bachelor's degree in architecture and Urbanism from the University of São Paulo. She was a professor of architecture at the Catholic University in Campinas and served as an architect for the State Housing Agency (CDHU) in São Paulo. She taught history at Florida International University and worked on an oral history project about Brazil and Cuba at the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Miami. Author of numerous journal articles, she has contributed to two outstanding volumes on contemporary Brazil, The Brazil Reader (Duke 1999) and Municipal Services in the Modern City (Ashgate 2003).

top

Lecture
"New Paths in Brazilian Cinema: the 1990s"
Randal Johnson, U of California, Los Angeles
Monday, November 15, 2004

Randal Johnson is Professor of Brazilian Literature and Cinema at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of Literatura e Cinema: Macunaíma do Modernismo na Literatura ao Cinema Novo, Cinema Novo x 5: Masters of Contemporary Brazilian Film, The Film Industry in Brazil: Culture and the State, and Antônio das Mortes. Prof. Johnson has edited or co-edited of Brazilian Cinema, Tropical Paths: Essays on Modern Brazilian Literature, Black Brazil: Culture, Identity and Social Mobilization, and Pierre Bourdieu's The Field of Cultural Production. He is currently writing a book on Portuguese filmmaker Manoel de Oliveira.

top

Lecture
"Men of the North: Caetano Veloso rereads Joaquim Nabuco"
Lídia Santos, Yale University
Friday, November 19, 2004

Teaching Brazilian and Latin American Literature at Yale University, Dr. Santos is the author of Kitsch tropical: los medios en la literatura y el arte de America Latina. Awarded the 2003 prize from LASA Brazil Section in the category  “Brazil in Comparative Perspective,” the book is now in its second edition. An English edition is due in 2004.  She has co-edited Contemporary Latin American Cultural Studies, with Stephen Hart and Robert Young (2003), and Ritualidades latinoamericanas: Un acercamiento interdisciplinario, with Martin Lienhard (2003). She has published two books of her own short stories, Flauta e Cavaquinho and Os Ossos da Esperança. Lídia Santos received the Guimarães Prize from Radio France Internationale in 1992. Her work in progress includes, Brazil: Cosmopolitan Nation and Tears for Export: Soap Operas and Literature.

top

QuickLinks

x

myUMD

x