The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture / Tagus Press is a multidisciplinary international studies and outreach unit dedicated to the study of the language, literatures and cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world. Working in close partnership with the Department of Portuguese and the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives, it is the oldest of these units devoted to Portuguese at UMass Dartmouth.

Events - 2015

2014-2015 Lecture Series

"Portugal's 25th of April 1974 Revolution and its Legacies: Historical Perspectives" 

Public Lecture by Dr. Douglas Wheeler

Thursday, April 23, 2015 from 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
UMass Dartmouth Claire T. Carney Library, Room 314 (Viewing Room)

Free and open to the public. Please use parking lot 13. Space is limited.

25th of April 1974
"Portugal's 25th of April 1974 Revolution and its
Legacies: Historical Perspectives". 
Public Lecture by Dr. Douglas Wheeler

The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Department of History and the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture 2014-2015 Lecture Serie cordially invite you to a special Public Lecture by Dr. Douglas Wheeler to Commemorate the 1974 Revolution in Portugal:

Title: "Portugal's 25th of April 1974 Revolution and its Legacies: Historical Perspectives" 
Place: UMass Dartmouth Claire T. Carney Library, Room 314 (Viewing Room)
Date & Time:  Thursday, April 23, 2015 from 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Free and open to the public. Please use parking lot 13. Space is limited.

Abstract:  "Portugal's 25th of April 1974 Revolution and its Legacies: Historical Perspectives." This lecture will attempt to explain the major factors behind Portugal's so-called "Carnations Revolution" of 1974 and to outline the important social, political, cultural and economic consequences which can be felt to this day. Europe's longest surviving dictatorship, the Estado Novo, was replaced by a young democracy and Portugal's overseas empire, wracked by more than a decade of a colonial war, was dissolved. What was the nature of the key players in this political drama, including the important group of military officers, the Armed Forces Movement (MFA), and how did Portugal's struggling young democracy avoid an impending civil war in Portugal while it was unable to prevent a civil war in its former colony, Angola?  How close did Portugal come to becoming "The Cuba of Western Europe?"

Dr. Douglas Wheeler is emeritus Professor of History at the University of New Hampshire, where he held the Prince Henry the Navigator Chair in Portuguese History.  He was among the first Fulbright research fellows in Portugal, where he did research in Lisbon in 1961-1962.  Wheeler’s early scholarly focus was on modern African history, especially modern Angola and Mozambique -- his dissertation was on Portuguese expansion and rule in nineteenth-century Angola.  Later, his focus shifted to modern Iberian history, especially Portugal since 1850.  His special interest is in political history and history of Angolan nationalism, and his later work is on history of espionage and secret intelligence.  In addition, Dr. Wheeler managed a research network based at UNH, the International Conference Group on Portugal, from 1972-2002, and founded the pioneering academic Journal, Portuguese Studies Review in 1991 (which continues under the direction of Dr. Ivana Eble at Trent University in Ontario, Canada).
Selected publications from Douglas Wheeler include:  Angola [co-author, René Pélissier] (Greenwood Press, 1971; Praeger Press, 1978); História de Angola (Lisbon: Tinta-da-China, 2009); revised Portuguese translation of Angola; Republican Portugal: A Political History, 1910-1926 (University of Wisconsin Press, 1978 & 1998); and Historical Dictionary of Portugal [co-author, Walter C. Opello, Jr.] (Scarecrow Press, 1993 & 2010).

Generously sponsored by UMass Dartmouth’s Department of History and the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture.
Contact: Dr. Timothy Walker, Director, Tagus Press, and the UMass in Lisbon Study Abroad Program at twalker@umassd.edu

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